Kilauea Lighthouse

Kilauea Lighthouse

Kilauea Lighthouse + Moku Ae Ae Island

These are two attractions with exquisite wildlife to visit on the North Shore. To get to the Kilauea Lighthouse, drive on HI-56 North and make a right on Kolo Road. Then make a left on Kilauea Rd. Stay on Kilauea Road until you reach the end of the road. There you will find the historic Kilauea Lighthouse. Here’s a map!

Did you know that Kilauea Lighthouse is home to eight indigenous seabirds? Bring your binoculars just in case you want to see a glimpse of the Red-Footed Bobby bird, or the Koa‘e Kea or White-Tailed Tropic bird. It is a beautiful lookout point to experience for the whole family and to learn about the seabirds and their habitats.

The history of Kilauea Lighthouse is quite interesting as well. It was built in 1912, and in 1927 became an important key to aviation and sea travels. When pilots would struggle flying over Oahu during the bad storms, they would look for Kilauea’s light to find their way. Kilauea Lighthouse led the aviation planes and ships to safety, serving Hawaii for 63 years. Through the efforts of many great leaders like the late Senator Inouye, the beautiful white tower has been restored to its former glory.

Kilauea Lighthouse has protected the wildlife since 1985, when it became the Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge. In 1989, the visitor center was finally finished. There you can learn more about Kilauea Lighthouse and the wildlife through their videos. If you want to take home a souvenir, visit their KPNHA Bookstore & Gift Shop. For more information on their tours, visit their website at: www.kilaueapoint.org

When at Kilauea Lighthouse, look out towards the blue Pacific Ocean. There you can check out the tiny Moku Ae Ae Island. It is very visible from the lookout point. If you look very closely, you might find some interesting visitors, like the colorful seabirds and Hawaiian Monk Seal. It is simply amazing to see this tiny island, and has you daydreaming of California’s Alcatraz Island without its prison.